11 Points You Should Consider When Looking for a New Ball

11 Points You Should Consider When Looking for a New Ball

1. Choose a ball that is the correct size

Generally, younger players need a size three, pre-teens need a size four, and teens and adults need a size five. However, this varies in different leagues. It's important for you to practice with the same size as you will be using in game play so that you can get used to the way the ball plays off your foot and the way it moves through the air.

2. Choose an indoor or an outdoor ball

Indoor balls are made specifically for the conditions of indoor soccer and are very different from other types of ball. Choose the ball that suits your normal practice and play conditions.

3. Choose a ball made of the right material for your needs

If you are looking for a bargain, rubber balls seem like a good deal. They are not only cheap, but durable. However, they are nothing like the balls used in league play.

Any practice using a rubber ball will be wasted because the feeling, texture, and movement are so much different from other types of ball. PVC is a little more expensive and gives a better feel, although it has a plastic feel that is not as good as other materials.

Leather is a more expensive option, but it tends to absorb water and become too heavy for play. For this reason, most leagues use a moderately priced polyurethane ball, a synthetic material that is similar to rubber but more durable and water resistant.

4. Choose a ball with the right type of bladder

The bladder is the inside part of the ball and gives the ball its shape and movement. Butyl bladders are the type used in cheaper balls. While they hold air well, they are not as responsive as latex bladders.

Latex bladders are used in the higher quality balls and give the best play. They lose air more quickly than other bladder types and thus must be inflated more often, but they are overall the best choice for the price.

 If you like this article, Follow us on FACEBOOK and INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST!

5. Choose a ball with the right panel number and design

The number of panels determines how the ball moves through the air as well as how much control the players have. This can range from 32 panels for an original type ball to a 6 paneled ball meant for indoor soccer.

Generally, a ball with fewer panels will be more aerodynamic and faster, while a ball with more panels will be more controllable and playable. The United States Major League Soccer currently uses an 18 panel ball, and this seems to be the case in most other professional level leagues.

6. Choose a ball that is the right weight

Generally, the lighter ball is the preferred one. If the ball is too heavy, it may hurt to kick it very hard and lose momentum quickly.

 7. Choose a ball that is neither too soft nor too firm

A hard ball will hurt feet and heads, while a soft ball will be too bouncy. Choose a happy medium for best success.

8. Choose a ball that is sewn together

There are a wide variety of ways to put together a ball, but none are as durable or easy to use as a ball with sewn together panels. The other balls are so flimsy they are almost disposable, so always choose a ball that has been sewn rather than glued or otherwise bonded.

9. Choose a ball that is the right price

A good ball can usually be bought for around fifty dollars, which seems like a high price unless you are considering the craftsmanship, quality materials, and research that go into a ball of this caliber. However, for children's play, a cheaper ball is more practical. But as you move into more and more competitive teams, you will generally need a higher quality and more expensive ball.

10. Choose a brand that suits your tastes and your needs

The difference between the different brands is not always quality so much as the research and the way they are made. You can try different brands to see which ones work for you and then look at the different prices within that brand.

The major brands such as Nike, Puma, and Adidas offer balls in a wide variety of price ranges, most of which are high enough quality for an amateur.

11. Choose a ball that is as similar as possible to the one your league will be using in games

There's no use practicing on a ball that will be different than the one used in your games. All of your passes, shots, and ball skills will need to be different as well, giving you a disadvantage when it comes to being successful.

Keep in mind that choosing a high quality ball that meets your unique needs is the first step to finding success on the soccer field.

Source: http://www.soccer-training-guide.com

 If you like this article, Follow us on FACEBOOK and INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST!






Also in Soccer Moms

Why You Should Get Your Family Involved in Sports
Why You Should Get Your Family Involved in Sports

0 Comments

Sports is life. That’s what a former college professor of mine used to often preach. He’d regularly deliver thoughtful lectures analogizing a sports-related matter to a real-life situation. It was then, after my youth team sports “career” was concluded, that I gave meaningful thought about the real importance of sports; including tangible lessons learned. While […]

View full article →

Father's Day Gift Guide 2020 - Great Gifts for Soccer Dads
Father's Day Gift Guide 2020 - Great Gifts for Soccer Dads

0 Comments

We've put together a guide of the best Father's Day gifts - from personalized picks that may require a few extra minutes to craft a message to no-brainer picks. Our list is also chock-full of inexpensive gifts that Dads will actually love and use. We've been there, and we know it can be difficult to find something perfect.

10 Best Fathers Day Gift Ideas 2020 - Great Gifts for Soccer Dads!

View full article →

Off-Season Training Tips & Advice
Off-Season Training Tips & Advice

0 Comments

If you’re a sports mom, you understand my desire to provide my kids with every opportunity to grow and develop in their sport. With summer halfway over and the school year getting ready to start, I want my young athletes to start preparing—mentally and physically—for the beginning of fall sports.

View full article →