9 Back to School Health and Wellness Tips

9 Back to School Health and Wellness Tips

Summer is over, and now it is time to get back to school. However, preparing your kids for school involves more than buying a new backpack, shoes, or a uniform. Preparing for their health is now essential, especially with CV19 still lurking. Nowadays, healthy habits need to be a priority and part of the routine. To kick off a healthy start to the new school year, consider these tips you and your child can do together. It would help if you were the role model for your child to set the standards for them to follow your lead.

Develop a Strong Immune System

Make sure you and your child eat enough essential vitamins and minerals daily like potassium, magnesium, calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin C. You can take supplements but try to strive for natural fruits like bananas, oranges, pumpkin seeds, almonds, etc. These foods are simple to eat and easy to carry around, requiring no preparation. Usually, when people have to prepare food, it decreases the value of a habit; probably the reason fast food is so popular.

Proper Nutrition

Your body is the same as your car. If your car is not tuned up and functioning well, it will strain and lead to damage as you drive it. If you and your child do not eat well, you both will struggle throughout the day with low energy. And, when you struggle with low energy, your body will start to wear down. When your body wears down, your immune system is more susceptible to colds and flu. Eat well to develop sound energy, so each day is not a chore but enjoyable and productive.

Eat Together

Eating together is one way to make sure your kids are eating healthy. Many great healthy vegetables grow during Autumn, like beets, cabbage, pumpkin, kale, broccoli, squash, and dark leafy greens. They all are great for making delicious soups as well. The food you feed and prepare for your kids will hopefully influence them to eat better and eat well.

Wash Your Hands Regularly

Make sure you and your child are washing your hands regularly with soap and water. Also, since it will be getting cold, make sure you apply hand cream or a moisturizer after washing. The cold air can chap your hands. I know alcohol gels are very popular but be cautious about using them often because it is not healthy for your skin and will dry your hands out faster in the cold.

Develop Mindfulness

The more mindful you are, the more you can teach and remind your kids to do things habitually. For example, mindfulness will help you and your child remember to wash your hands, eat well, and think about your health. Habits these days are essential when taking care of yourself as well as to prevent flu and sickness. Mindfulness is key when it comes to prevention.

Buy A Good Backpack for Your Child

Firstly, make sure the backpack fits. It is crucial for your child’s posture. When choosing a backpack, make sure the shoulder straps are wide and padded. Make sure the bag is not too long and stops above the hips around the lower back area. Remind your child not to sling the back onto one shoulder and use both backpack straps to avoid poor posture. Finally, don’t overpack the backpack to be heavy. Research says that a child’s backpack should not weigh more than 10-20% of your child’s body weight.

Set Sleep Times

When school starts, schedules become full. However, don’t let it carry over into your sleep time. Know when to stop work and begin to wind down. Your body needs to have enough rest and recovery to have good energy for the next day. Children and yourself who lack sleep have difficulty concentrating, retaining information, and learning. Set a consistent time for you and your child to sleep every night and wake every morning.

Develop Sleep Routines

Get into a routine to help you and your child relax and fall asleep. Shut off electronics 2-3 hours before bed. Take a hot bath or shower. You Mom or Dad can take a bath with Epsom salts that will really make your body feel relaxed. On the contrary, poor sleep or not getting good quality sleep will produce lower academic scores and lateness. Younger children need 10-12 hours per night. Teenagers need about 8-10 hours.

Have a Good Breakfast

Your child needs brainpower in the morning before school. Children who skip breakfast are tired and don’t perform well academically. And, the same goes for you, Mom or Dad. You need your energy to work and be productive too! Eggs are one of the best foods to eat in the morning. They are simple and easy to make. Also, breakfasts high in fiber and grains will help boost you and your child’s concentration and memory.

You have to be the role model to set a positive example. So, try to follow the rules you set, at least in front of your child. Consistency is the foundation of good practices. And good habits lead to successful outcomes.

 Source: https://www.stack.com

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